Skip to main content

Counting Images, a FireFox Add-on

Many of my clients ask me to test their content management and processing systems. Often this involves investigating how the software handles images of various sizes as well as text of various lengths or types.

To help create test-images, I created this little FireFox Add-on. The Counting Images add-on starts with one click and can be used to create an image of a custom size.

For example: if you need a 300x250 MPU advert image - just enter 300 and 250 into the panel and click Create Image. To download the image, just click on it - as you would a a link and choose Save.

The image files are named widthxheight.png, and include markings to help identify if they have been truncated e.g.:



The marked numbers refer to the size in pixels of the rectangle they are in. E.g.: the blue rectangle (always the outermost one) is 150x100 pixels in size.

Another example:
As you can see the rectangles start at the defined size and count down in steps of 20 pixels.

What could go wrong? Well a good example is very thing and tall images. The image edge might actually truncate the text specifiying its height e.g.:


 The image here is 30x1001 but the narrowness means the visible text is 30x100.
 


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Why you might need testers

I remember teaching my son to ride his bike. No, Strike that, Helping him to learn to ride his bike. It’s that way round – if we are honest – he was changing his brain so it could adapt to the mechanism and behaviour of the bike. I was just holding the bike, pushing and showering him with praise and tips.
If he fell, I didn’t and couldn’t change the way he was riding the bike. I suggested things, rubbed his sore knee and pointed out that he had just cycled more in that last attempt – than he had ever managed before - Son this is working, you’re getting it.
I had help of course, Gravity being one. When he lost balance, it hurt. Not a lot, but enough for his brain to get the feedback it needed to rewire a few neurons. If the mistakes were subtler, advice might help – try going faster – that will make the bike less wobbly. The excitement of going faster and better helped rewire a few more neurons.
When we have this sort of immediate feedback we learn quicker, we improve our game. When the f…

Thank you for finding the bug I missed.

Thank you to the colleague/customer/product owner, who found the bug I missed. That oversight, was (at least in part) my mistake. I've been thinking about what happened and what that means to me and my team.

I'm happy you told me about the issue you found, because you...

1) Opened my eyes to a situation I'd never have thought to investigate.

2) Gave me another item for my checklist of things to check in future.

3) Made me remember, that we are never done testing.

4) Are never sure if the application 'works' well enough.

5) Reminded me to explore more and build less.

6) To request that we may wish to assign more time to finding these issues.

7) Let me experience the hindsight bias, so that the edge-case now seems obvious!

Google Maps Queue Jumps.

Google Maps directs me to and from my client sites. I've saved the location of the client's car parks, when I start the app in the morning - it knows where I want to go. When I start it at the end of the day, Google knows where I want to go.
This is great! It guides me around traffic jams, adjusts when I miss a turn and even offers faster routes en-route as they become available.
But sometimes Google Maps does something wrong. I don't mean incorrect, like how it sometimes gets a street name wrong (typically in a rural area). I don't mean how its GPS fix might put me in a neighbouring street (10m to my left - when there are trees overhead).
I mean wrong - As in something unfair and socially unacceptable. An action, that if a person did it, would be frowned upon.
Example:
Let’s assume a road has a traffic jam, so instead of the cars doing around 60 mph, we are crawling at <10 mph.
In the middle of this traffic jam, the road has a junction, an example is shown here: