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Counting Strings

If you've done the Rapid Software Testing course, then you'll probably be familiar with the Perlclip tool, from James Bach. If not, its a useful tool for generating strings of test text. In particular I find the Perlclip Counter-string function to be pretty useful. Counterstring builds a string that indicates its own length. E.g.: "*3*5*7*10*" The last asterisk is the 10th character.

Now available as a Firefox Add-on!

I've taken the counterstring functionality and implemented it in HTML and Javascript. While this form does not do everything the original [and the best] does, It might be useful for it to be accessible anywhere via a web page. All credit for the usefulness of this goes to James Bach, all the bugs are probably my doing.

Thats right - its got bugs, like you don't have to enter a character for the 'mark' or it lets you use numbers for the 'mark'. Older versions did odd things in IE6 etc. There are no doubt many more bugs...

Display a string of length:

The character: marks the spot.



The String you requested is:

The string created has a length of:


Comments

  1. There's a good reason to allow numbers for the mark: some fields prevent or reject the entry of non-alphanumeric characters before other processing happens. Some do the same with non-numeric characters. So right away, I wouldn't classify "lets you use numbers for the 'mark'" as a bug, but a feature.

    ---Michael B.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Any bugs added on purpose? :)
    Regards,
    Ajay

    ReplyDelete
  3. Good initiative & very helpful :-)

    I like the error message "Go try a different browser" funny :-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Brilliant Peter.

    I hope you will add more and more to this very useful take on the tool by James.

    ReplyDelete

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